Pearl Theater Palms Casino Resort

Garbage Setlist at Pearl Concert Theater at Palms Casino Resort, Las Vegas

submitted by wewewawa to garbage [link] [comments]

9/11 and the Mandela Effect

9/11 and the Mandela Effect
You’ve probably seen the meme that says we’re living in the wrong timeline. While this sounds like a joke, there might be some truth to it. There are some researchers who claim what happened on 9/11 was a temporal event that caused our timeline to split in two. Supposedly there is a parallel world where the Twin Towers still exist and the apocalypse is being avoided. This is not to say I think we are living in the wrong timeline, but that is something I will get into in another thread. Just know that there is still hope.
Perhaps the darkest timeline is needed for some collective shadow work.
However, I do think our timeline has been altered and probably more times than once. While this is not something you can really prove, there are many oddities surrounding 9/11 as well as a synchronistic pattern hidden in pop culture that seems to point to this. In the movie Back to the Future, after the protagonist accidentally activates a time machine and alters the future, the Twin Pines Mall becomes the Lone Pine Mall. Notice how the clock reads 9:11 when flipped upside down.
134 reads like hel when flipped upside too. Are we living in a bardo state like in the movie Jacob's Ladder or the show The Good Place?
Was this a reference to the Mandela Effect and the Twin Towers becoming the One World Trade Center? In the second Back to the Future movie, the protagonists accidentally create a new timeline where a wealthy man named Biff takes over their town. Biff lives in a skyscraper casino and turns their town into a chaotic dystopia. According to the screenwriter Bob Gale, Biff was based on Donald Trump. This is not a political statement, I’m just saying it’s odd how things turned out.
I wonder if Bob Gale knew Trump would run for president?
In the Super Mario Bros. movie, a meteorite impact millions of years ago caused the universe to split into two timelines, the one we live in, and one where dinosaurs evolved into a humanoid race. President Koopa, a reptilian human hybrid, seems to be another caricature of Trump. President Koopa wants to merge his dimension with ours and attempts to rule Manhattan from the Twin Towers, which are portrayed as a gateway between worlds. The Super Mario franchise is strange when you think about shamans eating mushrooms to commune with serpent gods.
Looks kind of similar, right?
There are many more examples of the WTC acting as a gateway. In an episode of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the Twin Towers are used to transmit energy that propels the earth into another dimension. Take note of the sphere between the buildings, this will become relevant later. In the intro of Power Rangers: Time Force, a machine called the Time Shadow is seen standing on the towers. Take note of the moon in the background as well. This will become relevant too. During the final scene of Fringe season 1, the WTC is seen intact in a parallel universe. In the intro of Power Rangers: Time Force, a machine called the Time Shadow is seen standing on the towers. Take note of the moon in the background as well. This will become relevant too. During the final scene of Fringe season 1, the WTC is seen intact in a parallel universe.
I miss cartoons.
Another interesting example can be found in Star Trek. In the show, space explorers are sent back in time to stop an alien invasion in the 1940s that altered the outcome of WWII and allowed the Nazis to invade the US. Once they kill the alien leader, one of the characters tells the protagonist that the timeline has corrected itself just as an image of the Twin Towers burning passes in the background.
From Star Trek: Enterprise
The idea of a parallel world where the Nazis won WWII is very prominent in pop culture. But why is this? Is it possible creative people can intuitively sense other realities while absorbed in the act of creating? Philip K. Dick believed that’s what he did when he wrote The Man in the High Castle. He claimed:
"I in my stories and novels sometimes write about counterfeit worlds. Semi-real worlds as well as deranged private worlds, inhabited often by just one person…. At no time did I have a theoretical or conscious explanation for my preoccupation with these pluriform pseudo-worlds, but now I think I understand. What I was sensing was the manifold of partially actualized realities lying tangent to what evidently is the most actualized one—the one that the majority of us, by consensus gentium, agree on."
Coincidentally, Philip K. Dick was one of the first modern thinkers to predict the Mandela Effect. He once declared:
“we are living in a computer-programmed reality, and the only clue we have to it is when some variable is changed, and some alteration in our reality occurs.”
The Nazis were rumored to be in possession of a time machine known as Die Glocke, or in English, The Bell. They were supposedly taught how to build this device by extraterrestrials and the craft was said to be kept in a facility known as Der Riese, or The Giant. It sounds far fetched, but The Nazi Party was actually formed from The Thule Society, an occult group that dabbled in channeling and other magical practices. They were also known to use the Black Sun symbol, an esoteric representation of a gateway into another dimension.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sun_(symbol))
In Twin Peaks, a show about a small town caught in the midst of an interdimensional battle between good and evil, there seems to be a reference to Die Glocke. In season 8 there is a device that looks just like it, and at one point, a character called The Giant appears next to it.
A conception of Die Glocke compared to the mysterious bell device in Twin Peaks.
Twin Peaks is full of occult symbolism. In one episode a character is given instructions to find a portal that opens 253 yards east of Jack Rabbit’s Palace at 2:53 pm on October 1st. This portal is located in Washington. However, there is another in Las Vegas. Strangely enough, on October 1st, 2017, the Las Vegas shooting occurred in a lot 253 yards away from the Luxor Hotel, a giant black pyramid with the strongest beam of light in the world shooting out of it. Victims were mostly those attending the Route 91 Harvest music festival.
There's also black pyramids on the instructions.
But it gets stranger. Jason Aldean was one of the headliners. If you look at his tattoos, there’s a Jack card and an Ace card underneath a black sun, which as mentioned earlier, is an occult symbol that represents a portal. This card from the Illuminati game is almost identical. A Jack is worth 10 points. An Ace is worth 1 point. This odd coincidence seems to be a reference to the date 10/1. Keep in mind this date looks like the number 101. This will become relevant too. But was the Route 91 Harvest a literal harvest of souls meant to energize a portal?
This one is too much of a coincidence for me.
The name Twin Peaks seems to be a reference to the Twin Pillars, a Masonic concept that originated from the Biblical idea of Boaz and Jachin, two pillars that stood on the porch of King Solomon's Temple. The Twin Pillars can be found in ancient architecture all over the world and are sometimes used in Tarot. They are said to represent a doorway into a higher realm. In this Masonic artwork, you can see the Black Sun between them.
Jachin, Boaz, and the Black Sun.
The Twin Pillars and the gateway in between can be represented by the number 101. In Twin Peaks, the entrance to The Black Lodge, a place that exists in another dimension, is depicted as a rabbit hole between two trees, which resembles a zero between two ones. In George Orwell’s famous novel 1984, Room 101 is a place where people’s worst fears come true. In The Matrix, Neo’s apartment number is 101. Here it’s interesting to note that he escapes the matrix by going in room 303. This year marks 303 years since Freemasonry was founded. Perhaps they will make their getaway come December? Many occult researchers claim the Twin Towers were supposed to represent the Twin Pillars. There even used to be a statue called The Sphere placed in between them, making the buildings resemble the 101 Gateway.
The Black Lodge entrance from Twin Peaks and The Sphere centered between the Twin Towers.
Is it possible that the WTC‘s design was intended to create an interdimensional doorway using sacred geometry? Some say the Twin Towers even acted as a tuning fork. The buildings were wrapped in aluminum alloy with a resonant hollow interior. If you look at the picture above and to the right, you can kind of see how the sides of the towers even look like one. The Colgate Clock also once faced the WTC from across the water. If you’ve read my previous threads, you’ll probably notice it’s octagonal shape. Many portals in pop culture are portrayed as being 8 sided, like CERN, the largest particle collider in the world. Many conspiracy theorists speculate CERN is actually an interdimensional doorway. Some of the scientists working there have even said this. Why is there so much symbolism? Can it all really be just a coincidence at this point? Did 9/11 really alter our timeline?
The Colgate Clock compared to CERN.
According to many people, 9/11 is the reason the Statue of Liberty’s torch is closed. However, this isn’t true. Lady Liberty’s torch has been closed for over 100 years. Yet, there are some people who claim to have visited it. But according to official history, this is impossible. In this reality, The Black Tom Explosion was the reason the Lady Liberty’s torch closed. The explosion occurred in 1916 and was one of the first foreign attacks on US soil prior to Pearl Harbor. The explosion was also one of the largest non-nuclear explosions ever documented. The explosion was so powerful it caused the outer wall of Jersey City's city hall to crack and the Brooklyn Bridge to shake. Ironically, besides Lady Liberty’s torch, the explosion lodged shrapnel in the clock tower of The Jersey Journal building, stopping the clock at 2:12 am. It also caused windows miles away in Times Square to shatter. Perhaps the matrix was trying to tell us something. Was this a time shattering event?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Tom_explosion
https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g60763-d103887-r126254125-Statue_of_Liberty-New_York_City_New_York.html
Some people also claim they remember the Statue of Liberty being on Ellis Island. However, it has always been on Liberty Island. Once again, this is not something I recall learning in school. I’m sure some people do, but if my theory is correct, it’s because only some people in this timeline are from the old one. However, you can still find what appears to be residue left over from the previous reality.
Residue from a previous reality?
There are references in pop culture that seem to hint at the connection between the Mandela Effect and Lady Liberty as well. In the video game Assassin’s Creed Unity, the protagonist must find an exit portal to get himself out of a simulation. He finds it on the statue’s torch. In the movie Men in Black II, the statue’s torch is actually a giant Neuralyzer, a handheld device that uses a bright white flash to wipe people’s minds. At the end of the movie, the torch is activated and it illuminates the sky, erasing the memory of everyone in New York City.
The scenes from Assassin's Creed and Men In Black II
In the Netflix series The OA, a show about people who can jump between parallel universes, the Statue of Liberty shows up a lot. It seems to play an important role that was never really explained due to the show’s sudden cancellation. Some fans have pointed out that in one scene, Lady Liberty is holding her torch in the wrong hand. Some say this was just an error while others think it may have a deeper meaning.
The Statue of Liberty scene from The OA.
In The OA, the protagonist searches for The Rose Window, an object she says acts like a portal to other dimensions. I find this very symbolic considering the Twin Pillar symbolism mentioned earlier. Many older cathedrals have huge rose windows centered between two tall towers.
Old cathedrals with 101 Gateway symbolism built into the architecture.
If you’ve read my previous threads, you might have already made the connection that the 101 Gateway is another version of the Saturn Stargate. If you’re not familiar with the theory, we live in a simulation controlled by Saturn and the Moon, and The Elite are tying to break out. Our simulated reality is sometimes represented by a cube, and some say The Kaaba is one of these symbolic structures. The Kaaba sits between two pillars underneath a clocktower with a crescent moon on top.
Kaaba at Mecca.
Ironically, Fritz Koenig, the artist who created The Sphere sculpture between the Twin Towers, said The Kaaba was the inspiration behind his art installation. We can see this symbolism repeated in much of our pop culture as well. In the video game Fortnite, a giant cube destroys a location called Tilted Towers then forms a portal in the sky. At another point in the game, it is revealed that the cube’s true form is a giant demon named the Storm King. His horns are reminiscent of a crescent moon.
The second time you fight the Storm King its at a location called Twine Peaks lmao.
But are there anymore significant Mandela Effects associated with the WTC? According to some people, Hurricane Erin never happened in their timeline. If you‘re unaware, like I was until recently, there was a massive hurricane headed right for New York on the morning of 9/11. Because of the events that occurred on 9/11, I understand how Hurricane Erin would be easy to forget. Nevertheless, the storm was strange. Hurricane Erin, which was slightly larger than Hurricane Katrina, received almost no media coverage as she charged toward New York City. On the morning of 9/11, just as the planes were about to hit, Hurricane Erin grew to her largest size, but slowed down and remained almost stationary off the East coast. But right after the WTC fell, she made a sharp right turn and headed back out to sea.
Hurricane Erin on September 11th, 2001.
Hurricane Erin’s name is also interesting. The name Erin originated from Ériu, a goddess typically seen by the sea playing a harp. I find this curious becau HAARP uses extremely powerful radio frequencies to heat up the ionosphere and create clouds of plasma. Not only does this affect the climate, but the electromagnetic waves produced by it could hypothetically mess with our minds, perhaps changing or even erasing our memories. se many conspiracy theorists blame HAARP for both weather manipulation and the Mandela Effect.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89riu
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-frequency_Active_Auroral_Research_Program
In my last thread, I talked about MH370. I believe it’s disappearance, like the events discussed in this thread, was a part of a Saturn Stargate ritual. A sacrifice to the god of time. Would it be beyond the god of the fourth dimension to grant someone access to a wormhole? Perhaps The Elite are not purposely creating Mandela Effects and branching timelines. Perhaps it is just a side effect of trying to beak the matrix. But I digress. At the end of my last thread I said I would talk more about rabbit symbolism and its association with time travel. However, before I talk about that, or the Law of One, I thought I should talk about this first. Thanks for reading.
Oh yeah, in case you did read my last thread, check this out. The fact that this article was posted 2 weeks after my MH370 conspiracy post has me kind of spooked lol.
https://nypost.com/2020/10/07/washed-up-debris-on-australian-beach-could-belong-to-missing-mh370/
submitted by nickhintonn333 to conspiracy [link] [comments]

The USA PATRIOT Act: The Story of an Impulsive Bill that Eviscerated America's Civil Liberties

The USA PATRIOT Act provides a textbook example of how the United States federal government expands its power. An emergency happens, legitimate or otherwise. The media, playing its dutiful role as goad for greater government oversight, demands "something must be done." Government power is massively expanded, with little regard for whether or not what is being done is efficacious, to say nothing of the overall impact on our nation's civil liberties.
No goals are posted, because if targets are hit, this would necessitate the ending or scaling back of the program. Instead, the program becomes normalized. There are no questions asked about whether the program is accomplishing what it set out to do. It is now simply a part of American life and there is no going back.
The American public largely accepts the USA PATRIOT Act as a part of civic life as immutable, perhaps even more so than the Bill of Rights. However, this act – passed in the dead of night, with little to no oversight, in a panic after the biggest attack on American soil since Pearl Harbor – is not only novel, it is also fundamentally opposed to virtually every principle on which the United States of America was founded. It might not be going anywhere anytime soon, but patriots, liberty lovers and defenders of Constitutional government should nonetheless familiarize themselves with the onerous provisions of this law, which is nothing short of a full-throttle attack on the American republic.

What’s Even in the USA PATRIOT Act?

What is in the USA PATRIOT Act? In the Michael Moore film Fahrenheit 9/11, then Rep. John Conyers cracked wise about how no one had actually read the Act and how this was in fact par for the course with America's laws. Thus, before delving into the deeper issues surrounding the PATRIOT Act, it is worth discussing what the Act actually says. Here’s a brief look at the 10 Titles in the PATRIOT Act:
Most of the provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act were set to sunset four years after the bill was passed into law. However, the law was extended first by President George W. Bush and then by President Barack H. Obama. The latter is particularly scandalous given that, at least in part, a rejection of the surveillance culture that permeated the Bush Administration was responsible for the election of Obama in 2008.

Passing the USA PATRIOT Act

Next, it’s important to remember the environment in which the USA PATRIOT Act was passed: Post-9/11. It is not the slightest bit of exaggeration to label the environment in which the PATRIOT Act was passed as “hysterical,” nor is “compliant” a misnomer for the Congress of the time. Opposition to the Act was slim and intensive review of one of the most sweeping Acts of Congress in American history was nonexistent.
All told, Congress took a whopping six weeks drafting, revising, reviewing and passing the PATRIOT Act. That’s less time than Congress typically spends on totally uncontroversial and routine bills that don’t gut the Fourth Amendment. The final vote found only 66 opponents in the House and one (Wisconsin Democrat Russ Feingold) in the Senate. The entire passage of the PATRIOT Act, from start to finish, took place behind closed doors. There were no committee reports or hearings for opponents to testify, nor did anyone bother to read the bill.
“Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism” is the bloated and overwrought full name of the bill, crafted by a 23-year-old Congressional staffer named Chris Cylke. This ridiculous name puts the focus not on the surveillance aspects or the erosion of basic civil liberties enshrined in Western society since the Magna Carta, but on patriotism. At the time of its creation, the messaging was very clear: Real patriots support massive intrusions on civil rights. As President George W. Bush said at the time, “Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists.” This sentiment very much seemed to apply to American citizens.
While the argument that if you have nothing to hide you shouldn’t fear investigation is anathema in a Constitutional republic with regard to citizens, it should be standard operating procedure when it comes to our organs of government. If we cannot expect transparency from the United States Congress – elected officials charged with representing the will of the people and protecting the Constitution – then we certainly can’t expect it anywhere else.

The Unfortunate Growth of the USA PATRIOT Act

It’s no surprise to those in the liberty movement that given an inch, the government (in particular the military-intelligence community) took a mile. Even the nebulous definition of “terrorism,” largely centered around a long litany of acts rather than the motivation behind them, has expanded to include receiving military training from a proscribed organization (without actually committing any terrorist acts or even acts of violence of any stripe) as well as “narcoterrorism” – the latter particularly convenient, as the United States government continues its losing “War on Drugs.”
Indeed, in many ways, the War on (Some) Drugs was the template for the War on Terror. Both wars have no defined enemy, no defined terms of victory. Instead, they are waged against a nebulous concept, while enjoying bipartisan support for their ever-expanding budgets. What’s more, it didn’t take long for the Feds to start using the USA PATRIOT Act for things it was never intended for, including prosecuting the War on Drugs.
Perhaps the silliest application of the USA PATRIOT Act is the prosecution of Adam McGaughey. McGaughey maintained a fansite for the television series Stargate SG-1. The Feds charged him with copyright infringement and computer fraud. In the course of their investigation, the FBI leveraged the PATRIOT Act to get financial records from his website’s ISP. This was made possible by the USA PATRIOT Act amending the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, allowing for search and seizure of ISP records.
The New York Times discovered in September 2003, that the USA PATRIOT Act was being used to investigate alleged drug traffickers without what would otherwise be sufficient probable cause. These were investigations into non-terrorist acts using a law ostensibly designed to investigate terrorism. There was some suspicion that the Act was being used to investigate crimes occurring before the Act was passed, violating the ex post facto clause of the United States Constitution.
In one of the biggest power grabs (excluding virtually everything we know from Edward Snowden – more on that below), the FBI sent tens of thousands of “national security letters” and procured over one million financial records from targeted businesses in Las Vegas. These businesses were primarily casinos, car rental bureaus and storage spaces. The data obtained included financial records, credit histories, employment records and even people’s personal health records.
The FBI maintains and databases this – and, indeed, all information collected through the USA PATRIOT Act – indefinitely. In the good old days before the PATRIOT Act, the Feds were compelled to destroy any evidence they collected on someone later found not guilty of a crime. Note that the aforementioned data collection brought to public attention by Edward Snowden (which, again – we’re getting to that) falls under this provision. Not only is the government collecting obscene amounts of private and personal information about you, they’re also storing it indefinitely with no plans to stop.
What’s more, the FBI has approached public libraries to turn over the records for specific terminals, collecting information not about specific users who might be under investigation, but about anyone who has ever used the computer at the public library. Libraries, to their credit, have been very much at the forefront of resistance against the PATRIOT Act, with some litigating compliance despite operating on small budgets and others posting “canary letters,” which effectively say “The FBI Hasn’t Been Here Yet.” The removal of such a letter would warn patrons that the FBI has been sniffing around in their records.
Indeed, the greatest criticism of the PATRIOT Act is the simplest and perhaps most obvious: Why does an Act ostensibly passed to fight terrorism so drastically expand the government’s power to investigate virtually everyone else? The PATRIOT Act is not merely unconstitutional, it is an unprecedented expansion of state power in the Anglosphere, a culture based on restricted government and the primacy of individual rights.
An excellent example of this is the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) expansion. Most people are familiar with the term “FISA court,” but very few people actually know what it is – a special federal court created under the Carter Administration that grants approval of electronic surveillance of both citizens and resident aliens in the event that they are accused of acting in the service of a foreign power. The last part of this sentence is very important: The FISA courts are not simply for allowing surveillance of anyone that it might be expedient to collect information about. The scope of their powers is very, very limited.
Or was.
The PATRIOT Act lowered the burden of evidence required to obtain a FISA warrant for electronic surveillance and expanded the overall scope of the FISA courts. Any savvy federal agent can now drape his charges in the garb of (what else?) “national security” and obtain electronic surveillance privileges hitherto only dreamed of by investigators. FISA courts have become pliant tools in the hands of the Feds, gladly approving their requests to monitor phone and internet surveillance, as well as access to medical, financial and educational records.

The Future of the USA PATRIOT Act

Do we still need the PATRIOT Act? Did we ever? All laws are certainly a product of their times. But this seems much more acutely true of the USA PATRIOT Act, which was passed in a rush and under duress without due consideration.
Particularly in light of the revelations from Edward Snowden – that the government is spying on everything they possibly can – it’s worth asking if there’s any walking back. He points out that the police state apparatus was originally for drug dealers, then for terrorists, but ultimately ended up being applied to anyone and everyone.
What’s more, Bob Bullard notes another frightful aspect of the USA PATRIOT Act: Terrorism-related cases are not subject to the Freedom of Information Act. This means that there is little or no oversight. There is no surer hallmark of a police state than an all-powerful domestic surveillance agency with no transparency or oversight. While the USA PATRIOT Act might not create an American Stasi as such, it certainly paves the way for one.
Continue reading The USA PATRIOT Act: The Story of an Impulsive Bill that Eviscerated America's Civil Liberties at Ammo.com.
submitted by ammodotcom to Libertarian [link] [comments]

[S] King's Survivor Gallipoli: Saints Vs Sinners

After I tried to stop this series and start a new series (which failed), I am back in the driver's seat for King's Survivor's final phase, since it would probably have lasted longer if Adobe didn't cancel Flash (thanks for rushing my series, mate!). This season, I tried to do what u/swoldow did before and make a season called Saints Vs Sinners, where 10 people who embody the term "Saint" will face off against the people who embody the term "Sinner", but unfortunately, it seemed like a lot of the people who signed up misunderstood the definition of saints and sinners. For the love of god, someone who is slightly villainous is not a "sinner", and average people are not "saints". Oh well. I guess it's the best I'm gonna get. Here is the cast:
Kahramanca (Saints) Tribe:
Ardet Prifti, 31, Rhythm Guitarist, u/Twig7665
Ardet lived a difficult life. Born in Albania with a family that was associated with the mafia meant that Ardet was never safe, and one day, he came back home to find his whole family had been murdered by the Albanian mafia. He spent years on the street, struggling to survive, before he discovered his musical talent. He played a guitar (which he had to steal), which enabled him to earn money. After a few years of doing that, he moved to the United States, where he did his best to get into the largest music college in that country, and actually succeeded. He met some people that became his bandmates, and soon they were pretty popular in the underground scene. When their fame exploded, Ardet's bandmates grew either egotistical or paranoid, but Ardet saw fame as a way to spread awareness for mental illness. He has now become a strong supporter of mental health charities around the country, and he signed up for Survivor to raise money for one of the charities he supports.
Ava Chrisly, 23, Kindergarten Teacher, u/Gemini_B
Ava was born deaf. After her father died when she was 3, her birthmother struggled to care for her and her 3 siblings. Ava was especially tough since she needed special treatment and one night her birthmother left her on the doorstep of a rich widow with a note explaining how Ava got there. The Widow, not wanting to deal with a deaf child, left her outside where she spent a cold night alone and scared. She came across Marissa, a young girl who ran away from home. Marissa took pity on her and the two banded together.
They spent years together on the street with Ava learning to read lips and Marissa learning sign language. Marissa quickly saw that Ava had a gift with children and encouraged her to find a job with kids. Ava didn’t want Marissa to leave, but then Marissa surprised her by revealing she had a scholarship to a teachers college. Ava went off to the collage and became a kindergarten teacher, but when she returned she learned that Ava had gone to jail for stealing from a rich old woman and using the money to bribe a college administrator. Ava promised she’d help bail Marissa out, and learned about survivor. She’s hoping she can win the million to help free Marissa and get their lives on track.
Chelsea Rutherford, 22, Lifeguard, u/IAmWolfNinja
Chelsea was the heiress to the throne of a foreign country with a corrupt government. The wealth that came with such a status meant nothing to her, since she was utterly disgusted with the actions of her family. Knowing her resentment for their governmental policies, Chelsea's family gradually became verbally abusive towards her. Unable to take any more, she escaped as a teen to pursue her own path. When she arrived in America, Chelsea wanted to do everything she could to erase her dark past and the actions of her family, so she got a job as a lifeguard, where she has saved countless lives. She's occasionally recognized as an heiress, but when it's brought up, she tends to have nervous breakdowns.
Chester "Cap'n" Richardson, 67, Retired Naval Officer, u/swoldow
Some may see him as just the average old man, but Cap’n has seen and done things most people couldn't fathom. Cap’n joined the navy at a ripe young age about 5 years before the Cold War began, and learned everything from afar, slowly working up the ranks. When things got bad in Vietnam, he was given the chance to take charge of a ship during the war, and he immediately said yes. He ran the ship strictly, but he got both respect from everyone, as well as being genuinely liked as a person by his crew. He led them to many naval victories but unfortunately that didn't last, when his ship was shot with a torpedo, which blew the whole thing up and killed everyone on it, except for Cap’n. With the emotional baggage of watching people he has gotten to know kick the bucket, he immediately resigned from the navy after. As a result of the shipwreck, his mindset has changed, as he’s now super overprotective of his family, and still can't let the explosion go after years and years of retirement. He hopes Survivor can help him learn more about himself, and be the thing he needs to live the rest of his life in peace.
Cornelius Von Helton, 52, CEO, u/Gemini_B
Cornelius was raised by a family that had fallen from riches and was in tough times. He never expected to get to go to university but got lucky by getting a scholarship for his creative greeting cards. While at university, he enrolled in a business course and after collage started a greeting card business with some friends. All of his friends quickly gave up on the business, but Cornelius stuck through it. When he made a greeting card that was delivered to Eddie Murphy, the comedian was impressed and hired him to do his greeting cards to his friends, family, and invitations to parties. Quickly other celebrities started to hire his business and many fans wanted to get into the trend. His business rapidly expanded and he soon found himself with a company that covered parties, greeting cards, published books and even dabbled in a touch of Realestate. While in his thirties though, Cornelius was mugged while on a walk in the park and got stabbed. He was quickly rushed to the hospital and while there, he was nursed back to health by his soon to be wife. He claims that she saved his life and proceeded to date her after leaving the hospital. She was reluctant at first, but he quickly charmed her and the two have been married for 15 years now. He has two children, a son aged 10 and a daughter aged 8. He's continued to run his business, but leaves most of the work to his higher-ups as he wants to be able to spend as much time with his family and employees as possible. He views his employees as his family and does his best to remember all their names and make the workspace as nice for them as possible. He's come to survivor because his wife loves the show and wanted to compete, but due to growing health issues can't. She's trained him to win, and he wants to do this and win for her.
Dana Vasquez, 43, Stay At Home Mom, (filler character)
Greg Zimmer, 40, High School Teacher, u/AngolanDesert
Greg is one of the nicest people you will ever meet. He is very trusting and kind and will do anything for the people he loves. Since he grew up in Texas, hard work has always been his priority. He knows that if he wants to win this game, he has to work hard at everything he does. Greg decided to be a high school teacher so he could teach his students the importance of hard work. He has been a fan of survivor for a while, so when he saw that applications for survivor were going out, he knew he had to join in. Hopefully, he won’t disappoint his students.
Gwendolyn "Gwen" Wallerby, 52, Baker, u/ghetra
Gwen works at a bakery where she gets to do what she loves every day: make many different kinds of pies. She is a very warm, loving person and has a reputation for helping out whoever needs it, usually by baking for them. Baking takes a lot of patience and strength, and she is stronger than she looks. She naturally has a very loud voice that sometimes irks people, but once they get to know her it quickly becomes endearing. Now that her children are out of the house, she has started reading much more and taking classes on different subjects that interest her. The world is her oyster.
Kirk Smolarek, 62, History Teacher, u/Twig7665
Kirk never had a normal childhood. His mom walked out on his family not long after he was born, and his father was a former Polish soldier with PTSD and a severe drug addiction, leading to Kirk experiencing abuse from him for as long as Kirk can remember. Wanting to escape his miserable life, he smuggled himself on a boat bound for Australia when he was 16. Lo and behold, the ship got caught in a windstorm and ended up sinking, and Kirk and a few other survivors ended up stranded on an island. After spending more than a month there, he was taken back to his homeland after being found there. He ended up being the only survivor of the whole ordeal. He was returned to his deranged father, where the next time his father tried to abuse him, he fought back, causing his father to end up in the hospital. Deemed not guilty because he defended himself, Kirk did not spend time in prison for this. His father on the other hand did spend time there for drug-related charges and child abuse, but was killed by another inmate before he could be released. Kirk then went to college, where he studied history there, and decided to become a history teacher. He then kept that job title for over 40 years now, and despite being in his 60s, he is still an enjoyable presence for his students, as he incorporates unusual teaching methods to make his students interested in what he's teaching. Despite being financially stable, he wants to win the money so he can be well off when he retires in a few years.
Maralyn Sander, 32, Tour Guide, u/Void_Drone
Maralyn gives tours of New York, driving around in her bus, answering questions, watching broadway shows. And she spends most of her money on her family, except for the money she spent on her pink pearl necklace. She enjoys the tours for the most part, but when she's alone she vents about how annoying the tours can be.
Kotu Adam (Sinners) Tribe:
Alexa Station, 20, YouTuber, u/IAmWolfNinja
A 3AM YouTuber who arrived late to the trend, Alexa has a tendency to flex her belongings when no one really cares. She was recently involved in a scandal where she faked her boyfriend's death, causing endless amounts of controversy, and a near arrest. Her sub count is dropping significantly every day, so she joined to help gain her popularity (relevancy) back.
Carter Witworth, 23, College Student, u/JTsidol
Witworth, he was born to a extremely rich family, but his parents didn’t have time for him, but spoiled him rotten, when he got into school, he was known for being a bully, however no one confronted him, and everytime he’d get in trouble or fail a test, his parents would pay his way out, last year, he got a slap in the face, when his parents yet again had to bribe the college board to accept him, they cut off his allowance, he’s playing just for the money, nothing else.
Irvin Eamers, 32, Olympic Sprinter, u/asiansurvivorfan
A born athlete, Irvin loved competing in all sports but wasn’t known to play fair as he was never a team player and would often torment others to win. He started training for the Olympics at the age of 17 and eventually got the opportunity to compete in multiple Olympics where he took home many gold medals. However, they were striped from him when he was caught doping and using steroids to give him an edge in races. After the controversy, Irvin’s current wife left him and he was banned from competing in any future competitions. He came on Survivor for one reason and that is that is the money as he’s currently being sued by the Olympic committee.
Jessica Abrefa, 25, Poker Player, u/Twig7665
Jessica wasn't the most well off growing up, she lived in Alabama, where racism was rampant. As such, she was bullied for her race, until one day, she decided that they will all be wrong about her not being able to do anything because of her skin colour. She publicly humiliated the whole football team at her high school, and that stunt got her expelled in her senior year. She didn't care, and then she decided to run away to Las Vegas, which she did. While there, she started modeling, but found it boring. She then picked up the hobby of gambling, and played her first poker match when she was 21. She proved herself to be a formidable foe by beating one of the top poker players at the time, a dude named Brett Herman. Impressed by her skills, he tried to form a bond with her, but she turned him down due to him being a very paranoid man. Now, Jessica dates and cheats on men almost daily, and is considered one of the top female poker players, despite only playing for a few years. An avid Survivor fan, she wants to be as flirty and manipulative as she is in her real life. The only problem would be meeting another poker player, but she finds it unlikely that she will.
Joey "Wildcard" Caruso, 24, Poker Player, u/wordonthestreet2
Joey did not grow up with the best moral compass as his father notoriously had ties to the mafia. He used the money his father made through illegitimate businesses to gamble throughout his teenage years. When his father learned about his poker abilities and how easy it was for him to manipulate his opponents they began using his poker career as a way to launder mafia money through various casinos. He is known for his excellent poker face and unpredictable style of play which earned him the nickname Wildcard.
Maize Nguyen, 28, Heiress, u/Vicctoryy
From the outside looking in, the Nguyen Family Dynasty of San Francisco looks like a well supported and strong business, but from the inside, things are crumbling apart. The matriarch and patriarch are always at each other's necks over the company, leaving their children to clean up their messes. Maize, being the oldest, has taken it upon herself to lead the company, and she leads with an iron will and even harder iron fist. While she seems like a worthy replacement for her faulty parents, she has never been afraid to leave with force. Anyone at the receiving end of a verbal lashing from Maize is likely to not return to work the next day, or ever again. She is arrogant, rude, demeaning, and yet she gets things done. Saving the company from absolute bankruptcy caused a lot of backlash, but Maize couldn't care less. Success should be accomplished by stepping on the necks of those who aren't ready for the power, and Maize has done that exact thing. Any person in Maize's way has been an obstacle she has to conquer, and with a flip of her finger, that obstacle is no longer a problem. She has never been afraid to crack a few eggs to make an omelette, and unfortunately, those eggs have just been working class people struggling to make minimum wage and put dinner on their table. Too bad for them according to Maize. Maize has come to Survivor to prove that the Nguyen Dynasty is far from over, and their business monopoly will run on for years with Maize at the front of it. She is the iceberg, everyone else is a ship with no idea of what's in their way. Those too bold to step in her way are trampled, quite literally. Maize has no problem with controversy, controversy brings attention, attention brings money, and money brings power.
Molly-Anne Benson, 26, Marketing Assistant, u/ghetra
Molly-Anne is a social butterfly. She loves chatting with people about pretty much anything and loves meeting and getting to know new people. She has a natural charm about her that draws people in, but sometimes people are bothered by how chatty she is. She also loves to gossip and is not above spreading rumors. However, she is rather sensitive and can be set off by just about anything. She frequently will push people's buttons if they offend her and will hold a grudge until the end of time.
Nikki Lopez, 29, Stripper, u/Void_Drone
Randall Martin, 49, Real Estate Agent, u/TDSwaggyBoy
Being a self proclaimed sleazeball, which is a very weird thing to be proud of, Randall's life was never too good. He didn't grow up with a lot of close friends. Sure, people liked him at first, but when they really got to know him they didn't appreciate him nor his antics very much. Randall had to make a name for himself. He quickly found a career in the world of real estate. Not even his co-workers enjoyed his company, but they appreciated his skills. Being a fast and smooth talker really pays off in his industry. And now, Randall wants to put his skills to use in SURVIVOR. How well will that pan out?
Vito Luco, 49, Used Car Salesman, u/swoldow
Vito is the last person you'd want to trust with anything. A true con-artist at heart, he now has a job selling used cars, but his past jobs would make you run away from him in fear. When he was younger, he was a part of a major drug-trafficking operation run by the mafia, and he later got a job selling illegal fireworks, both of which got him to do jail time for a decade. Newly released, he seems to be back to his old ways, as he scams people out of their money daily with his faulty cars. He was born constantly overshadowed by his perfect younger brother, who is a popular politician, while he just swindles from people. As a result, he hates people who play loyally, and wants to prove that evil is the best way to play. He isn't afraid to play hard, as that's what he did all his life, and he'll either win, or go out swinging.
Link to Season
Episode 1: The 20 new contestants are welcomed into Turkey, where their first task is to compete in a challenge for reward. The Sinners tribe win this reward due to having more young and fit members than the Saints tribe. As a result, the Saints are already demoralized as they arrive at camp. Cap'n starts to feel good vibes from Ardet and Maralyn, and takes them under his wing to form an alliance. Ava, on the other hand, reveals that she is deaf to Chelsea and Gwen, and the three form another alliance due to being close to one another already. Cap'n sees this and scrambles to find an idol, and does so. Over at the Sinners tribe, Witworth and Jessica see their opportunity to look for an idol, and they find it, giving them more security, while back at camp, Maize and Nikki get into a fight over thinking that the other has an idol, which neither of them do. Vito becomes the moderator of this fight, saying that the three of them plus Irvin and Molly need to stick together in the long run. Randall sees this alliance form and tries to get Alexa, Jessica, Witworth, and Wildcard on board, which they all agree to at first, but then Wildcard sees this as his opportunity to cause conflict within his tribe, so he becomes content with being a swing vote. The Sinners win immunity, and on the Saints tribe it quickly becomes a race to see who can scrape up the swing votes the fastest between Cap'n's alliance and Ava's alliance. Dana becomes the target for Ava's alliance because of her weakness in challenges and her blind loyalty, while Greg is targeted by Ardet and Cap'n due to his shiftiness. They are able to get Kirk and Dana on board to blindside Greg, and they try to talk to Gwen, but she does not flip. Instead, at tribal council, we end up with a 5-5 split, followed by a 4-4 vote split due to no one flipping. Then a rock draw occurs on the first vote of the season. Ardet becomes the victim of the rocks, sending him out of the game despite never receiving a single vote.
Episode 2: After an explosive first vote, Cap'n tries to figure out who flipped on the six and sent Ardet home. No one tells him who did it, so he assumes it was Ardet. Ava tries to flip Maralyn from Cap'n's alliance, but is unsuccessful at doing so. At the Sinners camp, Jessica and Witworth, despite being closely aligned, argue over who gets to keep the idol, and Witworth ends up keeping it in the end. The Saints pull out a surprise victory over the fractured Sinners, and back at camp, Wildcard decides to snake the alliance he was pretending to work with, and joins Vito's alliance. Their first target is none other than Alexa, who saw this game as nothing other than a tool to get more relevancy back, and it particularly irked Vito, who wanted to play against people who played hard. So together, with his alliance and Wildcard, they vote for Alexa. Meanwhile, the four person alliance realizes that Wildcard snaked them, so they vote for him, and Alexa becomes the second person voted off in a 6-4 vote.
Episode 3: After Alexa's vote off, Irvin tries to bond with Vito, wanting to be his right hand man, and they become closer due to both being sleazy people. Wildcard begins to feel like he's in control, and it starts to annoy people on his tribe. At the Saints camp, Cap'n starts to rub people the wrong way because of his cockiness due to having an idol, but no one catches on to him having an idol, which is good news for him, because he plans on holding onto the idol until the merge. The Sinners win immunity for the third time, and they grow cocky because of this. Cap'n and Kirk, being the two oldest men on the tribe, join forces with Dana and Maralyn to take out their biggest threat in the opposing alliance, Greg. However, the other side has majority, and they decide that Dana has been blindly loyal to the other three, and hasn't been pulling her weight in challenges, so she becomes the third person voted out in a 5-4 vote.
Episode 4: After a somewhat boring vote, Greg starts to get paranoid, since he's already gotten 9 votes and it's only episode 4. He then tries to get the minority alliance to pin their votes onto Gwen, but Gwen gets angry at him for doing so, and they have an argument. At Sinners camp, Jessica tries to talk to Irvin, trying to get his alliance to help hers take out Wildcard, and Irvin tells Vito about the plan, and Vito starts to see Wildcard as not being of use anymore. After losing the reward challenge, the Saints come back harder and beat the Sinners at the next challenge. Wildcard lets Vito know that he is going to vote Maize, since he wants to make a big move early on. This becomes the final nail in Wildcard's coffin, as Vito was quite close to Maize. At tribal council, Wildcard becomes the first unanimous boot of the season, going out in a 8-1 vote.
Episode 5: Vito starts to think that Irvin has been playing way too loyally, and he gets into a discussion with him that slowly devolves into a full-blown fight between them, but Vito, realizing that Irvin would make a bad enemy, tries to make it up to him, and it works. The Sinners win both reward and immunity, and they feel elated about it. Cornelius goes to Cap'n and proposes an alliance to him, allowing them to control things from behind the scenes with Maralyn. He also reveals that he has grown a disdain for Greg, and that they need to flip the numbers on him. They get Gwen and Kirk on board, or so they think, but Gwen blabs to Greg and their alliance, leading to Kirk to flip as well. They decide to vote Cornelius out due to him being the biggest gamer on the tribe, and he goes in a 5-3 vote.
Episode 6: The tribes pack up their things, anticipating a swap, but then the host announces that they will be competing for individual immunity on their tribe, and whoever wins will be safe from the double tribal council taking place that night. Maralyn wins for the Saints, and Vito wins for the Sinners. The Sinners also win reward, earning food to enjoy while they watch the other tribe go to tribal council. Witworth, Jessica, and Randall decide it was now or never to get rid of Maize, who had a fight with Randall earlier that day, but Vito, hearing about this, decides that Randall is the biggest sleaze on his tribe, and he needed to go as soon as possible. In his voting confessional, he states there can be only one sleazy guy on the tribe, and that was himself, so Randall had to go, and Randall becomes the sixth person voted out in a 5-3 vote, and he is bitter as all hell about it. At the Saints tribe, Cap'n becomes angry over the fact he cannot vote in the majority, and it makes the majority annoyed with him, so they decide to vote him off. Luckily for Cap'n, he still has an idol, so he and Maralyn vote for the most threatening player in their minds, Chelsea, and Cap'n plays his idol, sending Chelsea out of the game in a 2-0 vote.
Episode 7: After Chelsea's idol out, Cap'n officially became public enemy number one on his tribe, and he tries to find his rehidden idol, but Kirk finds it instead. Maralyn and Greg have a fight due to the food on their tribe running low, and morale being even lower. At the Sinners tribe, Nikki begins to be seen as an easy goat due to her one-sided loyalty to Vito. Morale at the Saints tribe dips even lower when they lose both reward and immunity. Not wanting to lose again,the majority decide to vote off their oldest member, Cap'n, as a last ditch attempt to prevent them from going on a losing streak. Cap'n and Maralyn vote for Greg, and Cap'n becomes the eighth person voted out in a 5-3 vote, missing out on the jury by one placement.
Episode 8: After Cap'n's vote out, there are only five members on the Saints tribe, compared to the Sinners having seven. The Sinners increase their winning streak by two by winning both reward and immunity. At the Sinners camp, Jessica and Witworth have another fight over the idol, with Jessica insisting that she keep it. This causes the rest of the tribe to be alerted to the fact that Jessica and Witworth have an idol, and Witworth becomes a target because of this. At the Saints tribe, the women form a tight three, and Kirk and Greg are forced to band together to survive. At tribal council, the three women stay strong, and Greg is voted out 3-2 and becomes the first member of the jury, leaving only four Saints left in the game.
Episode 9: With his back up against the wall, Kirk knows that he's probably gone next if he didn't have the idol, which ensured his survival until merge. The Saints finally win a challenge, a reward challenge, but lose immunity once again to the inflated egos of the Sinners. Not much else happens this episode, but Kirk tries to get Maralyn to flip and vote out Ava, but she disagrees to do so, and she votes for Gwen instead, making Kirk not trust her, and he decides to vote for her, while also playing his idol. This causes a 1-1-0 tie between Gwen and Maralyn, and Ava, misunderstanding what would happen if she forced a tie, votes for Gwen while Kirk votes for Maralyn, and Ava becomes the second person in King's Survivor history to be eliminated by default, due to there being no other options, and she becomes the second member of the jury
Episode 10: At long last, the tribes merge into the purple Ucurum tribe, meaning balance in Turkish. Left in the game is Witworth, Gwen, Irvin, Jessica, Kirk, Maize, Maralyn, Molly, Nikki, and Vito. At first, it seems like it would be Saint Vs Sinner, but Jessica and Witworth come to the three Saints left in the game, and they convince them to vote with them come tribal council. Vito wins his second immunity challenge of the season, and his target was Witworth for being the strongest male not in his alliance, and also for lying about not having an idol, which he believed was given to Jessica. At tribal council, the lines cause a 5-5 divide between Irvin and Witworth, and on the revote, Maralyn randomly decides to flip to avoid a tie, and Carter Witworth becomes the third member of the jury, and also another person to go out with an idol in their pocket. He is understandably pretty pissed about this ordeal, but wishes his tribe well.
Episode 11: The day after Witworth's blindside, the nine remaining contestants compete in a reward challenge, which the team containing Irvin, Maralyn, and Vito win. At the reward, Irvin and Vito realize how dangerous Maralyn could be after she starts trying to talk game with them. Soon afterwards, Maralyn finds the idol, and Jessica calls out Molly for following Vito almost blindly. Nikki wins the second post merge immunity challenge, and Vito tries to recruit Jessica for the vote, which succeeds. They then choose to target Maralyn, since she was the most threatening out of the three Saints, and the six remaining Sinners pin votes onto her. Unfortunately for them, Maralyn pulls out an idol, and the Saints vote for Irvin, a potential immunity threat, making him the fourth member of the jury in a 3-0 vote.
Episode 12: After Irvin's blindside, only two men are still in the game, compared to the six women. Nikki is able to find an idol, after thinking that she hasn't been playing hard enough, while Molly gets into a fight with Maralyn over the latter pulling out an idol, which she hadn't wanted her to do. Molly wins immunity, and it becomes a battle of the Saints Vs the Sinners, just like the theme of the season. The Saints go after Maize, wanting to weaken Vito further before going after him, but they are unable to swing anyone over and Vito, fueled by vengeance, gets his alliance to vote for Maralyn. In a 5-3 vote, Maralyn becomes the fifth member of the jury. Back at camp, the final seven become annoyed at Nikki's arrogance after being safe from being voted out, so she becomes a target for the two remaining Saints left. Kirk also becomes a target for being a perceived leader for Gwen, causing him to be target numero uno. After Kirk wins immunity, the target shifts from him to Gwen, due to her being perceived as not wanting to play the game, and rather would be along for the ride, which Vito found unpalatable. Kirk and Gwen then try to vote out Molly for her strength in challenges, and in the end, Gwen gets the boot in a 5-2 vote, making her the sixth juror.
Episode 13: With only six people left in the game, the final reward challenge takes place. Maize wins it, and she shares it with Vito, her closest ally, and Jessica, who her and Vito wanted to bring closer. Soon, they realize what a threat she could be, especially because she's a poker player, she becomes the biggest target instead of Kirk. Luckily for her, she wins immunity. Kirk tries to bond with Maize as a way to get Vito to not vote him out, but it backfires, and he becomes the biggest target yet again. At tribal council, he votes for Molly, but everyone else votes for him, making him the seventh juror in a 5-1 vote and completely eliminating the Saints from the game.
Finale: Jessica, Maize, Molly, Nikki, and Vito remain. Five players who had remarkably different playing styles, but all came from the same tribe. They compete in the second-to-last immunity challenge, which Maize wins, and the biggest target becomes Jessica again, who has proven herself to be the only player not following Vito, and only voting with him just to get further in the game. Vito does not feel the same way about keeping Jessica around, so he and his alliance with Nikki, Molly, and Maize vote for her, and Nikki plays her idol in case someone flipped on her, and Jessica becomes the eighth juror in a 4-0 vote. Back at camp, Vito feels incredibly cocky, and he tries to influence a fight, and he does so between Nikki and Maize. He then goes on to win final immunity, and Nikki tanks her own game with her fight with Maize, and everyone votes her out, causing her to become the ninth juror in a 3-1 vote. The final three consists of Maize, Molly, and Vito. Molly gets criticism for her lack of strategy, only using her social game to get far, and her challenge capabilities. Maize is seen as following too closely to Vito, but the jury is willing to vote for her if Vito tanks his jury speech. He does not, and explains his game in great detail, saying he started out forming a five person alliance on the first night, he commenced the Wildcard blindside, the Witworth blindside, the Jessica blindside, etc. He did it all, but the bonds he formed in the game were genuine, and he didn't intend his villainous backstabbing to be taken personal. In the end, he gets all the jury votes, even from two people he never met, Greg and Ava. Maralyn wins the Fan Favorite for standing up to Vito and her idol play.
Winner: Vito Luco, u/swoldow
Fan Favorite: Maralyn Sander, u/Void_Drone
Potential Returnees (yeah, I haven't done this in a while): Vito, Jessica, Kirk, Maralyn, WItworth, Ava, Cap'n, maybe Ardet, if I do a first boot season
Next season, will be the final season before season 35, I won't spoil the theme for 35, but trust me, it won't be a season to miss. Season 34 however, with the release of the new Island Of The Idols sim, it will feature two King's Survivor Idols, who will be revealed with the sign ups. Next season will be King's Survivor Venezuela: Island Of The Idols!
submitted by KingTyson27 to BrantSteele [link] [comments]

Report your table minimums here (COVID Edition)

6/17 Edit: Great info guys. Keep it coming! If something changes, please let me know.
I reached out to the mods asking about putting together a post to collect minimums for craps tables in Vegas and other places.
If this post gains traction, it may get a sticky. It may also help cut down on the amount of posts asking for this info.
I'll try to keep the body of the post updated. If information is correct, let me know.
Update 6/18 - Nevada Gaming Board announced masks required at table games in Nevada. I haven't heard that this is being enforced yet.
6/30: Keep reporting, especially any of you heading to Vegas. We would love to hear what the mins are on the strip
Let me know what casino, day or night and the minimums:
Vegas Strip Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Aria 15 25 Unknown
Bellagio 10 25 Yes, all tables Poker tables open
Caesars 15 25 No Poker tables open
Casino Royale N/A N/A N/A Table Games not open
Cosmo 100 50-100
Encore 50 100 Yes, on some tables Updated 6/16
Excalibur 10-15 Unknown 10 crapless, 15 regular
Flamingo Rare (5) - 15 25
Harrah's 15 25 No Confirmed no dividers per 6/16 Youtube video
Linq 15 25 No
Luxor 10 15
Mandalay Bay N/A N/A
MGM Grand 10 25 Yes, all tables
NY/NY 10 15 Yes, all tables
Osheas Unknown 15
Paris N/A N/A No Opened 6/18 - Masks required at tables.
Planet Hollywood N/A N/A No open date announced
Rio N/A N/A No open date announced
Strat Day 10 Unknown
Treasure Island 5 15
Venetian Unknown 25 No
Wynn 25-50 50-100 Yes, on some tables Updated 6/16
Downtown Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Binions 10 10
California 10 10
The D 10 15 No glass
El Cortez 10 10 Yes, some tables 2 tables
Four Queens 5 5 No Confirmed thru 6/14 Youtube video
Fremont 10 10
Golden Gate 5 5 From 6/9 on Vegas Message Board (no carnival games)
Sams Town 15 15 1 table
Offstrip Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Aliente 10 10
Boulder Station 10 10
Cannery 5 5 up to 2 tables, a mask was provided but not required
Ellis Island 5 5 1 table
Gold Coast 5 5
Green Valley Ranch 10 10 2 tables open
The Orleans 10 25 up to 4 tables, I was asked to wear a mask
Palace Station 10 10 Unknown
Palms N/A N/A No open date announced
South Point 5 5 2-3x tables w/ only one $5 buy in
Strat 5 10
Sunset Station 5 5
Other NV Casinos Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Edgewater (Laughlin) 10 10
Harrahs (Laughlin) 10 15 no
Atlantis (Reno) 5/10 5/10 2 tables with different mins
Cal Neva (Reno) 5 5
Circus Circus (Reno) Closed Closed Closed table game pit
Eldorado (Reno) 10 10
Grand Sierra (Reno) 15 15-25
Peppermill (Reno) 10 10 3 craps tables
Silver Legacy (Reno) 10 10
Hard Rock (Tahoe) Closed Closed Currently closed
Harrahs (Tahoe) 25 25
Montbleu (Tahoe) 10 15
Non/NV Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Foxwoods (CT) 15 25
Mohegan (CT) 10-50 10-50 2 were 10, 2 $15, 1 $25, 1 $50. Plus a high rollers table
Harrington (DE) 10 15-25 Must wear mask and face shield
Blue Chip (Michigan City, IN) 5 10 5 minimum prop bets, 5 min ATS bet.
L’auberge (Lake Charles,LA) 25/50 25/50 2 $25 min and 2 $50 min tables. 1 bubble craps $5 min
Harrahs (Shreveport, LA) 15 25
Margaritaville (Shreveport, LA) 25 25
Ocean Downs (MD) 10 15
Maryland Live (MD) 25 50 Yes 5 tables, 4 per side. Electronic craps 15 min
MGM @ National Harbor 50-100 Yes 4 craps tables 2 were $50 and 2 were $100 mins. Not bubble craps or low roller options.
Firekeepers (Battle Creek, MI) 10 15+ No dividers, only distancing 1-2 tables depending on demand, did see it at $15 during the day $25 on Fri/Sat night. Masks required, no smoking. $3 Bubble Craps.
River City (St. Louis, MS) 20 20 Unknown 4 players per side. $20 min. You have to have at least a $20 bet for every throw to "hold your spot"
Beau Rivage (Biloxi, MS) 25 25 unknown 3 tables
Boomtown (Biloxi, MS) 10 10 Unknown 1 table
IP (Biloxi, MS) 25 25
Scarlett Pearl (Biloxi, MS) 25 25
The Palace Biloxi, MS) 10 15
Treasure Bay (Biloxi, MS) 10 10
Hard Rock (AC, NJ 25 25 Yes 2 tables
Resorts (AC, NJ) 15 25 Yes 1 table
Ocean (AC, NJ) 15 25 Yes 4-6 tables
Hollywood (Columbus, OH) 10-15 Unknown Unknown 2 tables, masks required
Hollywood (Grantville, PA) 15 25 Unknown 2 tables, masks required
Meadows (PA) 10 10 2-3 tables.
Sycuan (San Diego, CA) 10 10 Masks required
Barona (So Cal) 5 5 3 tables, dealers managing bets for players.
Harrahs (So Cal) 15-25 15-25 Bubble craps $5 min, Interblock bubble $3 min, 1 electronic table $5 min
Viejas (So Cal) N/A 15 1 table
Southland Casino Racing (West Memphis, TN) N/A N/A Yes 4 tables all closed. Other pit games open with plexiglas dividers. Bubble craps $5 minimum.
Last update 7/9
There is a similar post for all games on the Vegas Message Forum
submitted by necrochaos to Craps [link] [comments]

Report your table minimums here (COVID Edition) part 3

Part 3 in the COVID series.
To try and make this list more helpful, I have added Weekend Day and Weekend Night, as those can be vastly different than during the week.
I'm trying to monitor Twitter and the Vegas Message Board to get some additional information.
Keep sharing all that wonderful goodness.
I'd like to update the wiki to talk about what sidebets casinos have, so if you know that info, I can add it to the table comments.
Vegas Strip Casino Day Min Night Min Weekend Day Weekend Night Dividers Comments
Aria 10 10 Unknown Unknown No Updated 7/26
Ballys 10 15 10 Unknown 3 tables Updated 8/8
Bellagio 10 25 Unknown Unknown Yes, all tables
Caesars 15 25 Unknown Unknown No
Cosmo 15-25 50-100 Unknown Unknown
Encore 10 10 10 10 Yes, on some tables Updated 8/12
Excalibur 10-15 15 10 15 Updated 8/12
Flamingo 15 15-25 Unknown 25 Updated 8/8
Harrah's 15 25 25 25 No
Linq 15 15 Unknown 25 No Updated 8/8
Luxor 10 10 15 15n Updated 8/12
Mandalay Bay 15 Unknown Unknown Unknown
MGM Grand 10 25 Unknown Unknown Yes
NY/NY 10 15-25 15 Unknown Yes Updated 8/8
Osheas Unknown 15 Unknown Unknown
Paris 15 15 Unknown Unknown No Updated 8/8
Sahara 5 10 10 10 Updated 8/15
Strat Day 10 Unknown 10 25 No
Treasure Island 5 15 Unknown Unknown
Venetian 10-15 25 Unknown Unknown No
Wynn 10 10 10 10 Yes, on some tables Updated 8/12
Downtown Casino Day Min Night Min Weekend Day Weekend Night Dividers Comments
Binions 5 10 Unknown Unknown Binions had $5 table several times (opens at noon) Updated 8/17
California 10 10 Unknown Unknown Tables open at 11AM Updated 8/10
The D 10 15 Unknown Unknown No glass
Downtown Grand 10 10 Unknown Unknown Table opens at noon. Updated 8/10.
El Cortez 10 10 10 10 Yes, some tables 2 tables Updated 8/15
Four Queens 10 10 10 10 No Updated 8/15
Fremont 10 10 10 Unknown Updated 8/10.
Golden Gate 10 15 Unknown Unknown Updated 8/18
Golden Nugget 10-15 10 Unknown Unknown $15 with one table open on 8/18
Plaza 10 10 Unknown Unknown Updated 7/30
Sams Town 15 15 Unknown Unknown 1 table
Offstrip Casino Day Min Night Min Weekend Day Weekend Night Dividers Comments
Aliente 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Boulder Station 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Cannery 5 5 Unknown Unknown up to 2 tables - now allowing 4 per side
Ellis Island 5 5 5 5 1 table - Updated 8/17 - I just called the pit at Ellis. Craps table opens up at 10am and its 5 dollars 90% of the time
Gold Coast 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Green Valley Ranch 10 10 Unknown Unknown 2 tables open
The Orleans 10 25 Unknown Unknown up to 4 tables, I was asked to wear a mask
Palace Station 10 10 Unknown Unknown Unknown
Palms N/A N/A Unknown Unknown No open date announced
Red Rock 10 15 15 Unknown Updated 8/14
South Point 5 5 5 10 No Updated 8/15
Strat 5 10 Unknown Unknown
Sunset Station 5 5 Unknown Unknown
Other NV Casinos Day Min Night Min Weekend Day Weekend Night Dividers Comments
Edgewater (Laughlin) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Harrahs (Laughlin) 10 15 Unknown Unknown no
Atlantis (Reno) 5/10 5/10 Unknown Unknown 3 tables on weekends
Cal Neva (Reno) 5 5 Unknown Unknown
Circus Circus (Reno) Closed Closed Unknown Unknown Closed table game pit
Eldorado (Reno) 5 10 Unknown Unknown
Grand Sierra (Reno) 15 15-25 Unknown Unknown
Peppermill (Reno) 5 5 10 10 3 craps tables
Silver Legacy (Reno) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Hard Rock (Tahoe) 5 5 Unknown Unknown
Harrahs (Tahoe) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Montbleu (Tahoe) 10 15 Unknown Unknown
Nugget (Wendover) 5 5 5 5 Updated 7/31
Peppermill (Wendover) 5 5 10 10 Updated 7/31
Rainbow (Wendover) 5 5 10 10 Updated 7/31
Non/NV Casino Day Min Night Min Weekend Day Weekend Night Dividers Comments
Wind Creek (Wetumpka, AL) 15 25 Unknown Unknown 4 to a table Updated 7/31
Sycuan (San Diego, CA) 10 10 Unknown Unknown Masks required
Barona (So Cal) 10 15 10 10-15 2 tables 2 per side, dealers managing bets for players. Updated 8/21 ($10 at times)
Harrahs (So Cal) 15-25 15-25 15-50 15-50 No Updated 7/31
Viejas (So Cal) N/A N/A Unknown Unknown No live tables
Foxwoods (CT) 15 25 Unknown Unknown
Mohegan (CT) 15-25 25 Unknown Unknown 2 were 10, 2
Harrington (DE) 15 15-25 Unknown Unknown Must wear mask and face shield
Rivers (Chicago, IL) 15 15
Blue Chip (Michigan City, IN) 5 10 Unknown Unknown 5 minimum prop bets, 5 min ATS bet.
Caesars Southern IN 10 15 15 25 Updated 8/5
French Lick Resort (French Lick, IN) 15 15 25 25 Tables open at 11am and close at 3AM. Updated 8/5
Harrah's Hooiser Park (Anderson, IN) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Indiana Grand (IN) 10 15 Unknown Unknown No
Belle (Baton Rogue, LA) 5 10 Unknown Unknown one half sized table sometimes they open the big one. $5 small table and $10 big late at night
Hollywood (Baton Rogue, LA) 5 10 Unknown 15 Updated 7/24
L’auberge (Baton Rogue,LA) 15 15 Unknown Unknown No
L’auberge (Lake Charles,LA) 15 15 Unknown Unknown No 1 bubble craps $5 min
El Dorado (Shreveport, LA) 10 10 10 10 Updated 8/17
Horseshoe (Shreveport, LA) 15 15 15 15 Updated 8/17
Margaritaville (Shreveport, LA) 15 15 15 15 Updated 8/17
Ocean Downs (MD) 10 15 Unknown Unknown
Maryland Live (MD) 25 50 50 Unknown Yes 5 tables, 4 per side. Electronic craps 15 min
MGM @ National Harbor 50-100 Unknown Unknown Yes 4 craps tables 2 were $50 and 2 were $100 mins. Not bubble craps or low roller options.
Firekeepers (Battle Creek, MI) 10 15+ Unknown Unknown No dividers, only distancing 1-2 tables depending on demand, did see it at $15 during the day $25 on Fri/Sat night. Masks required, no smoking. $3 Bubble Craps.
Four Winds Casino 15 15 Unknown Unknown Digital craps table 5$ min Tuesday and Sunday night. Did not check bubble craps
Gun Lake (Wayland, MI) 10 15 Unknown Unknown No Temp check, masks, usually the crapless table is open
Turtle Creek (Traverse City, MI) 5 Unknown Unknown Unknowned 2 tables, temp check, masks
Soaring Eagle (Mt Pleasant, MI) 10 15 Unknown Unknown Yes 5 players per side with glass. Tough to hear dealer.
Hollywood Casino, Maryland Heights (St Louis) MO 15 15 Unknown Unknown 1 regular table & 1 no craps. 4 per side. No outside drinks.
River City (St. Louis, MS) 20 20 Unknown Unknown Unknown 4 players per side. $20 min. You have to have at least a $20 bet for every throw to "hold your spot"
Beau Rivage (Biloxi, MS) 25 25 Unknown Unknown unknown 3 tables
Boomtown (Biloxi, MS) 10 10 Unknown Unknown Unknown 1 table
IP (Biloxi, MS) 25 25 Unknown Unknown
Scarlett Pearl (Biloxi, MS) 15 25 Unknown Unknown No Masks required, temp check
The Palace Biloxi, MS) 10 15 Unknown Unknown
Treasure Bay (Biloxi, MS) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Harrah’s Cherokee & Murphy 15 15 Unknown Unknown No
Harrahs River Valley (Murphy, NC) 25 25 Unknown Unknown
Ballys (AC, NJ) 15 15 Unknown 10 Updated 7/29
Caesars (AC, NJ) 15 15 Unknown 15-25 Updated 7/29
Harrahs (AC, NJ) 15 15 Unknown Unknown
Hard Rock (AC, NJ 15 25 Unknown Unknown 2 tables - Updated 7-29
Resorts (AC, NJ) 15 25 Unknown 15 Yes 1 table - Updated 7-29
Ocean (AC, NJ) 10 15 15 25 Yes 4-6 tables
Buffalo Creek (NY) 15 25 Unknown Unknown
Seneca Niagra (NY) 10 15 Unknown Unknown 1 table, can go up to $25
Jack/Harrah's (Cincinnati, OH) 25 25 25 25 3 tables, $25 open to close
Hollywood (Columbus, OH) 10-15 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 2 tables, masks required
Hollywood (Grantville, PA) 15 25 Unknown Unknown Unknown 2 tables, masks required
Harrah's Philly (PA) Unknown Unknown 15 25 Updated 8/10
Meadows (PA) 10 10 Unknown Unknown 2-3 tables.
Mohegan Sun (PA) Unknown Unknown 25-50 Unknown
Windcreek (PA) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Mount airy (PA) 10 10 Unknown Unknown
Valley Forge (PA) 10
Parx (Bensalem, PA) 15 25 Unknown Unknown 15 but maintaining 25
Southland Casino Racing (West Memphis, TN) N/A N/A Unknown Unknown Yes 4 tables all closed. Other pit games open with plexiglas dividers. Bubble craps $5 minimum.
Mardi Gras (Nitro, WV) 15 Usually open on weekends - Updated 7/28
*Last update 8/21
Part 1. It's getting buried so I figured we would make a new one. Part 2
Pulled additional info from here.
submitted by necrochaos to Craps [link] [comments]

Report your table minimums here (COVID Edition) part 2

The previous post is here. It's getting buried so I figured we would make a new one.
Keep reporting those minimums:
Vegas Strip Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Aria 10 10 Yes
Ballys
Bellagio 10 25 Yes, all tables )May be lower on weekday nights, $15 has been seen) Poker tables open
Caesars 15 25 No Poker tables open
Casino Royale N/A N/A N/A Table Games not open
Cosmo 15/25 50-100
Encore 50 100 Yes, on some tables Reports of $10 tables during the day
Excalibur 10-15 15 10 crapless, 15 regular
Flamingo 10-15 15-25
Harrah's 15 25 No
Linq 10-15 10-15 No
Luxor 10 10
Mandalay Bay N/A N/A
MGM Grand 10 25 Yes, all tables
NY/NY 10 15-25 Yes, all tables
Osheas Unknown 15
Paris 10-15 15 No Opened 6/18 - Masks required at tables.
Planet Hollywood N/A N/A No open date announced
Rio N/A N/A No open date announced
Sahara 5 10
Strat Day 10 Unknown
Treasure Island 5 15
Venetian 10-15 25 No
Wynn 25-50 50-100 Yes, on some tables Updated 6/16
Downtown Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Binions 5 10 Binions had $5 table several times with little to no social distancing
California 10 10 From 7/15 on Vegas Message Board
The D 10 15 No glass
Downtown Grand 10 10 Checks your temperature before letting you into casino, also NO valet, self-park only.
El Cortez 10 10 Yes, some tables 2 tables
Four Queens 10 10 No From 7/16 on Vegas Message Board, Four queens had a $5 table in the morning on saturday
Fremont 10 10 From 7/15 on Vegas Message Board
Golden Gate 10 15 From 7/14 on Vegas Message Board
Golden Nugget 10 10 From 7/15 on Vegas Message Board
Plaza 10 10
Sams Town 15 15 1 table
Offstrip Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Aliente 10 10
Boulder Station 10 10
Cannery 5 5 up to 2 tables - now allowing 4 per side
Ellis Island 5 5 1 table
Gold Coast 10 10
Green Valley Ranch 10 10 2 tables open
The Orleans 10 25 up to 4 tables, I was asked to wear a mask
Palace Station 10 10 Unknown
Palms N/A N/A No open date announced
Red Rock 10 15
South Point 5 5 2-3x tables w/ only one $5 buy in
Strat 5 10
Sunset Station 5 5
Other NV Casinos Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Edgewater (Laughlin) 10 10
Harrahs (Laughlin) 10 15 no
Atlantis (Reno) 5/10 5/10 3 tables on weekends
Cal Neva (Reno) 5 5
Circus Circus (Reno) Closed Closed Closed table game pit
Eldorado (Reno) 5 10
Grand Sierra (Reno) 15 15-25
Peppermill (Reno) 10 10 3 craps tables
Silver Legacy (Reno) 10 10
Hard Rock (Tahoe) 5 5
Harrahs (Tahoe) 10 10
Montbleu (Tahoe) 10 15
Non/NV Casino Day Min Night Min Dividers Comments
Foxwoods (CT) 15 25
Mohegan (CT) 10-50 10-50 2 were 10, 2 $15, 1 $25, 1 $50. Plus a high rollers table
Harrington (DE) 15 15-25 Must wear mask and face shield
Blue Chip (Michigan City, IN) 5 10 5 minimum prop bets, 5 min ATS bet.
Harrah's Hooiser Park (Anderson, IN) 10 10
Indiana Grand (IN) 10 15 No
Belle (Baton Rogue, LA) 5 10 one half sized table sometimes they open the big one. $5 small table and $10 big late at night
Hollywood (Baton Rogue, LA) 5 10 one half sized table sometimes they open the big one. $5 small table and $10 big late at night
L’auberge (Baton Rogue,LA) 15 15 No
L’auberge (Lake Charles,LA) 15 15 No 1 bubble craps $5 min
Harrahs (Shreveport, LA) 15 25
Margaritaville (Shreveport, LA) 25 25
Ocean Downs (MD) 10 15
Maryland Live (MD) 25 50 Yes 5 tables, 4 per side. Electronic craps 15 min
MGM @ National Harbor 50-100 Yes 4 craps tables 2 were $50 and 2 were $100 mins. Not bubble craps or low roller options.
Firekeepers (Battle Creek, MI) 10 15+ No dividers, only distancing 1-2 tables depending on demand, did see it at $15 during the day $25 on Fri/Sat night. Masks required, no smoking. $3 Bubble Craps.
Four Winds Casino 15 15 Digital craps table 5$ min Tuesday and Sunday night. Did not check bubble craps
Gun Lake (Wayland, MI) 10 15 No Temp check, masks, usually the crapless table is open
Turtle Creek (Traverse City, MI) 5
Soaring Eagle (Mt Pleasant, MI) 10 15 Yes 5 players per side with glass. Tough to hear dealer.
Hollywood Casino, Maryland Heights (St Louis) MO 15 15 1 regular table & 1 no craps. 4 per side. No outside drinks.
River City (St. Louis, MS) 20 20 Unknown 4 players per side. $20 min. You have to have at least a $20 bet for every throw to "hold your spot"
Beau Rivage (Biloxi, MS) 25 25 unknown 3 tables
Boomtown (Biloxi, MS) 10 10 Unknown 1 table
IP (Biloxi, MS) 25 25
Scarlett Pearl (Biloxi, MS) 15 25 No Masks required, temp check
The Palace Biloxi, MS) 10 15
Treasure Bay (Biloxi, MS) 10 10
Harrah’s Cherokee & Murphy 15 15 No
Harrahs River Valley (Murphy, NC) 25 25
Harrahs (AC, NJ) 15 15
Hard Rock (AC, NJ 25 25 Yes 2 tables
Resorts (AC, NJ) 15 25 Yes 1 table
Ocean (AC, NJ) 15 25 Yes 4-6 tables
Buffalo Creek (NY) 15 25
Seneca Niagra (NY) 10 15 1 table, can go up to $25
Hollywood (Columbus, OH) 10-15 Unknown Unknown 2 tables, masks required
Hollywood (Grantville, PA) 15 25 Unknown 2 tables, masks required
Meadows (PA) 10 10 2-3 tables.
Windcreek (PA) 10 10
Mount airy (PA) 10 10
Parx (Bensalem, PA) 15 25 15 but maintaining 25
Sycuan (San Diego, CA) 10 10 Masks required
Barona (So Cal) 5 5 3 tables, dealers managing bets for players.
Harrahs (So Cal) 15-25 15-25 Bubble craps $5 min, Interblock bubble $3 min, 1 electronic table $5 min
Viejas (So Cal) N/A 15 1 table
Southland Casino Racing (West Memphis, TN) N/A N/A Yes 4 tables all closed. Other pit games open with plexiglas dividers. Bubble craps $5 minimum.
Last update 7/21
Pulled additional info from here.
submitted by necrochaos to Craps [link] [comments]

505 books to read in quarantine for people who are bored af

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Kasimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to teenagers [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine If You’re Bored and Kinda Like Books (in No Particular Order)

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to cleanagers [link] [comments]

Garbage 'The World Is Not Enough' at The Pearl, Palms ... Billy Idol Live - Eyes Without A Face - Pearl Theater ... Scarlet Pearl Room Tour  Casino Walkthrough - YouTube 1988] Rain Man • Hans Zimmer № 12 - ''Las Vegas'' - YouTube HANDPAY on MAGIC PEARL LIGHTNING LINK in Vegas! - YouTube Korn 9/15/2018 Las Vegas, NV - Pearl @ The Palms FULL SHOW ... ★2 PEARL RARE WIN!★MUST WATCH★ BIG WIN! DRAGON SPIN SLOT ... Garbage 'Only Happy When It Rains' at The Pearl, Palms ... Pigs in Zen - Janes Addiction - Las Vegas, Pearl Ampitheater May 18, 2009 NIN  JA WALKING TOUR OF THE NEW PALMS CASINO FLOOR  LAS VEGAS USA ...

Saturday evening, the beautiful voice of Tori Kelly filled the air in The Pearl at Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas (Photo credit: Denise... Hotel, Casino & Club News. The Killers Rock The Pearl ... The Palms Casino Resort is proud to present some of the best events and shows you can experience in Las Vegas at their very own Pearl Concert Theater. The theater is designed to bring the best of the glitzy and glamorous Vegas lifestyle as well as the talent from some of the hottest musicians, comedians, and stage performers in the country. Las Vegas, NV; Pearl Concert Theater at Palms Casino Resort Tickets; Pearl Concert Theater at Palms Casino Resort Tickets. Get Ticket Alerts for this venue. Address 4321 West Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV 89103. Event Schedule (0) Venue Details. Select Your Category. Select Your Category. All Categories Concerts Sports Arts & Theater Film Misc. Select Your Dates. Select Your Dates. All Dates ... Las Vegas: Casino Sin City (Photo Book Book 4) (English Edition) Stadtkarte mit Knittereffekt Las Vegas Die leichteste Designkarte der Welt: unzerbrechlich, weich und wasserfest, kann geknotet, geschält und mehr gefaltet, ist cool. Die Crumpled Map haben einen völlig neuen Look, von der Straßenzuordnung bis hin zu den Farben der Farbpalette. Crumple before use: 100% waterproof; 87 × 58 cm ... Die bekannten Las-Vegas-Hotels Venetian und Palazzo stehen zum Verkauf. Zwei Interessenten bringen sich nun wohl in Stellung. Pearl Theater. Face the music, closer than ever. Details (702) 944-3200. Palms By Appointment Only. Overview. Private bars and lounges, 18 skyboxes and seats feet from the show— center stage is always front and center. VIP Boxes. Always center stage. Reserve A VIP Box. Upcoming Events. The Show Goes On. And On. From stand-ups to outstanding performances. See full calendar . Venues Policies ... The Pearl is Las Vegas' premier concert theater boasting accommodations for up to 2,500 ticket holders. Featuring a stage just four feet from the floor and the farthest seating area being a mere 120 feet from the stage, The Pearl offers the utmost in intimate viewing of your favorite acts. Private and semi-private skyboxes are located on each side of the venue offering private bars, lounges ... Palms Casino Resort is temporarily closed and currently not taking reservations. We are taking reservations at Palms Place. Any outstanding chips, slot tickets, keno tickets, front money deposits, or safekeeping can be redeemed at the Palace Station cages. To review Frequently Asked Questions please visit our blog at stationcasinosblog.com or ... Browse 37 godsmack performs live at the pearl at palms casino resort las vegas stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images. Explore {{searchView.params.phrase}} by color family {{familyColorButtonText(colorFamily.name)}} Singer Sully Erna of Godsmack performs live at the Pearl at the Palms Casino Resort on November 14 2015 in Las Vegas ... This circus-themed casino was built in the late 1960s and the man who established it was also in charge of developing the world-famous Caesars Palace casino. If you have watched "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," you definitely know how Circus Circus casino looks. Circus Circus was supposed to be a family-oriented casino but some strange things have happened inside it. After it opened, the ...

[index] [15464] [14161] [4399] [3818] [5019] [7648] [7692] [3597] [18118] [30075]

Garbage 'The World Is Not Enough' at The Pearl, Palms ...

★2 pearl rare win!★must watch★ big win! dragon spin slot machine★casino gambling★ las vegas slots! we had a blast playing dragon spin slot machine! it was so... Happy Wednesday everyone! We didn't get a chance to post during our travels but this was one handpay jackpot from our recent trip to Las Vegas. We stayed at ... Korn - Follow The Leader 20th Anniversary 9/15/2018Pearl Concert Theater - The Palms CasinoLas Vegas, NVSetlist: It's On!Freak on a LeashGot the LifeDead Bod... Las Vegas, Nv. March 13, 2020 Please remember to comment, like and subscribe On our way back to Houston TX from Columbus, Georgia, Ace and I stayed at the Scarlet Pearl in Biloxi (D’iberville) Mississippi. We were both pleasantly surp... Garbage perform 'The World Is Not Enough (TWINE)' at The Pearl at the Palms Casino and Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada on April 14th, 2012. Learn more about Garb... 50+ videos Play all Mix - Pigs in Zen - Janes Addiction - Las Vegas, Pearl Ampitheater May 18, 2009 NIN JA YouTube Teho - Space Explorers (Original mix) - Duration: 9:39. Labo T. Recommended for you FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM 👉🏼https://www.instagram.com/paul_r_letsgovideo/ Please SUBSCRIBE👉🏼http://bit.ly/2HBN2Wn , like and share. Be the FIRST to get our ... ★ December 16, 1988 — © United Artists. Music by Hans Zimmer - ''Las Vegas''Rain Man is a 1988 American comedy-drama film directed by Barry Levinson and writ... Garbage perform 'Only Happy When It Rains' at The Pearl at the Palms Casino and Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada on April 14th, 2012. Learn more about Garbage: Of...

http://cloudmining.fastmining.pw